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Malala Yousafzai

2019

by Karen Leggett Abouraya and Susan L. Roth

Growing up in the Swat Valley of Pakistan, Malala Yousafzai loved books and school. But in 2009, the Taliban came to power and closed all schools for girls. Malala, just eleven years old, began to speak and blog about the right of all children to receive an education. Soon fighting broke out and Malala's family fled the Swat Valley. After the fighting ceased, they returned home, and Malala continued to speak out. That's when she was shot by a Taliban gunman, but her life-threatening injury only strengthened Malala's resolve. In 2013, just nine months after being attacked, Malala addressed the United Nations about the right of every child to receive an education, and in 2014, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. At age seventeen, she was the youngest person ever to receive this honor. This book is more than a biography of a brave, outspoken girl who continues to fight for the millions of children worldwide who are not able to go to school. It is also a testament to the power of education to change the world for girls and boys everywhere.

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Spanish edition, Malala Yousafzai : guerrera con palabras, available inBates catalog

Maya Angelou

2019

by Danielle Jawando and Noa Snir

"Maya Angelou was an African-American author, poet, playwright and civil rights activist. She wrote seven autobiographies, three books of essays, several books of poetry, and a long list of plays, films and television shows. Never taking ‘No’ for an answer, Maya used her voice and her art to overcome prejudice and difficulty and to become an inspiration to those around her and to future generations. Her story is a rich and remarkable one – a tale filled with strength, hardship and hope. Maya learned the importance of using her own voice to help others and change the world!" -- publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Ona Judge outwits the Washingtons

2019

by Gwendolyn Hooks and Simone Agoussoye

"Soon after American colonists had won independence from Great Britain, Ona Judge was fighting for her own freedom from one of America's most famous founding fathers, George Washington. George and Martha Washington valued Ona as one of their most skilled and trustworthy slaves, but she would risk everything to achieve complete freedom. Born into slavery at Mount Vernon, Ona seized the opportunity to escape when she was brought to live in the President's Mansion in Philadelphia. Ona fled to New Hampshire and started a new life. But the Washingtons wouldn't give up easily. After her escape, Ona became the focus of a years- long manhunt, led by America's first president. Gwendolyn Hooks' vivid and detailed prose captures the danger, uncertainty, and persistence Ona Judge experienced during and after her heroic escape."--Provided by publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Queen of physics

2019

by Teresa Robeson and Rebecca Huang

"When Wu Chien Shiung was born in China 100 years ago, most girls did not attend school; no one considered them as smart as boys. But her parents felt differently. Giving her a name meaning “Courageous Hero,” they encouraged her love of learning and science. This engaging biography follows Wu Chien Shiung as she battles sexism and racism to become what Newsweek magazine called the “Queen of Physics” for her work on beta decay. Along the way, she earned the admiration of famous scientists like Enrico Fermi and Robert Oppenheimer and became the first woman hired as an instructor by Princeton University, the first woman elected President of the American Physical Society, the first scientist to have an asteroid named after her when she was still alive, and many other honors." -- publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Soldier for equality

2019

by Duncan Tonatiuh

José de la Luz Sáenz (1888–1953)—or Luz—believed in fighting for what was right. Although he was born in the United States, he and his family experienced prejudice because of their Mexican heritage. When World War I broke out, Luz volunteered to join the fight. Because of his ability to quickly learn languages, he became part of the Intelligence Office in Europe. However, despite his hard work and intellect, Luz often didn’t receive credit for his contributions. Upon his return to the US, he joined other Mexican-Americans whom he had met in the army to fight for equality. His contribution, along with others, ultimately led to the creation of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), which is the oldest Latino civil rights organization. Soldier for Equality is based in part on Luz’s diary during the war. It includes a biography of Luz’s later years, an author’s note, a timeline, a bibliography, and an index. -- publisher

Biography Cross Group Oppression & Resilience

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