Skip to content

Beautiful Shades of Brown

2020

by Nancy Churnin and Felicia Marshall

"Growing up in the late 19th century, Laura Wheeler Waring didn't see any artists who looked like her. She didn't see any paintings of people who looked like her, either. As a young woman studying art in Paris, she found inspiration in the works of Matisse and Gaugin to paint the people she knew best. Back in Philadelphia, the Harmon Foundation commissioned her to paint portraits of accomplished African-Americans. Her portraits still hang in Washington DC's National Portrait Gallery, where children of all races can admire the beautiful shades of brown she captured." -- publisher

Biography

Colin Kaepernick

2020

by Blake Hoena and Sam LeDoyen

"This graphic biography shows readers the moments that have defined Colin Kaepernick’s life as a quarterback and an activist. His talent and determination made him a college football success and brought him to the National Football League. As a quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, he led his team to multiple playoffs and even competed in the Super Bowl. When outrage over violence against African Americans became a national movement, Kaepernick joined the protests. His decision cost him his career in football, but he gained a voice heard worldwide." -- publisher

Biography Cross Group

Tabitha and Magoo dress up too

2020

by Michelle Tea and Ellis van der Does

"Tabitha and Magoo love to play dress up in their room. Tabitha uses her brother’s shirts to make superhero capes, and Magoo uses his sister’s frilly skirts to fashion a gown. They’re disappointed to think they can’t go outside in their new outfits, but then the gorgeous drag queen Morgana magically appears! With the help of their new friend, they learn to defy restrictive gender roles and celebrate being themselves. The trio, dressed in colorful costumes and riding in a flying car, then heads to the local library for a diverse and fun-filled story time." -- publisher

Any Child

A ride to remember

2019

by Sharon Langley and Amy Nathan

"When Sharon Langley was born, amusement parks were segregated, and African American families were not allowed in. This picture book tells how a community came together- -both black and white--to make a change. In the summer of 1963, because of demonstrations and public protests the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Maryland became desegregated and opened to all for the first time. Sharon and her parents were the first African American family to walk into the park, and Sharon was the first African American child to ride the merry-go-round. This was on the same day of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Sharon's ride to remember demonstrated the possibilities of King's dream ... The carrousel, fully functional, now resides on the National Mall, near the Air and Space Museum."--Provided by publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Many of the cover images on this site are from Google Books.
Using Tiny Framework Log in

STAY UP-TO-DATE ABOUT TRENDS IN MULTICULTURAL PICTURE BOOKS!

Sign up for our newsletter and get a FREE

color poster of our unique picture book categories