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A Bicycle in Beijing

2019

by Dawu Yu

"One day, while living in a hutong in Beijing, a boy returns home to find that his dad has purchased a shiny new bike for work. He begs his father to let him ride it. When his father finally agrees, he races around the neighborhood to show off the bike. Before long, the boy gets careless. He rips his pants, lets his friends pile on like acrobats in the circus, and finally wrecks the bike. Sheepishly, he returns the bike to his dad, who stays up all night fixing it. The experience teaches him the value of the bike and instills a deep respect for his father." -- publisher

Any Child Biography

A computer called Katherine

2019

by Suzanne Slade and Veronica Miller Jamison

"Katherine knew it was wrong that African Americans didn’t have the same rights as others–as wrong as 5+5=12. She knew it was wrong that people thought women could only be teachers or nurses–as wrong as 10-5=3. And she proved everyone wrong by zooming ahead of her classmates, starting college at fifteen, and eventually joining NASA, where her calculations helped pioneer America’s first manned flight into space, its first manned orbit of Earth, and the world’s first trip to the moon!" -- publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

A girl called Genghis Khan

2019

by Michelle Lord and Shehzil Malik

"Meet Maria Toorpakai Wazir, a Pakistani girl who loved sports and longed for the freedom that boys in her culture enjoyed. She joined a squash club to pursue her dream, and was taunted, teased, and beaten—but still continued playing. Then, when Maria received an award from the President of Pakistan for outstanding achievement, the Taliban threatened her squash club, her family, and her life. Although forced to quit the team, she refused to give up. Maria kept practicing the game in her bedroom every day for three years! Her hard work and perseverance in the face of overwhelming obstacles will inspire all children." -- publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

A library for Juana

2019

by Pat Mora and Beatriz Vidal

From a very young age, Juana Inés loved words. When she was three years old, she followed her sister to school and begged the teacher to let her stay so she could learn how to read. Juana enjoyed poring over books and was soon making up her own stories, songs, and poems. Juana wanted to become a scholar, but career options for women were limited at this time. She decided to become a nun—Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz—in order to spend her life in solitude reading and writing. Though she died in 1695, Sor Juana Inés is still considered one of the most brilliant writers in Mexico's history: her poetry is recited by schoolchildren throughout Mexico and is studied at schools and universities around the world.

Biography

Spanish edition, Una biblioteca para Juana, available in Bates catalog.

A life made by hand

2019

by Andrea D'Aquino

"Ruth Asawa (1926-2013) was an influential and award-winning sculptor, a beloved figure in the Bay Area art world, and a devoted activist who advocated tirelessly for arts education. This lushly illustrated book by collage artist Andrea D'Aquino brings Asawa's creative journey to life, detailing the influence of her childhood in a farming family, and her education at Black Mountain College where she pursued an experimental course of education with leading avant-garde artists and thinkers such as Anni and Josef Albers, Buckminster Fuller, Merce Cunningham, and Robert Rauschenberg. Delightful and substantial, this engaging title for young art lovers includes a page of teaching tools for parents and educators." -- publisher

Biography

A ride to remember

2019

by Sharon Langley and Amy Nathan

"When Sharon Langley was born, amusement parks were segregated, and African American families were not allowed in. This picture book tells how a community came together- -both black and white--to make a change. In the summer of 1963, because of demonstrations and public protests the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Maryland became desegregated and opened to all for the first time. Sharon and her parents were the first African American family to walk into the park, and Sharon was the first African American child to ride the merry-go-round. This was on the same day of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Sharon's ride to remember demonstrated the possibilities of King's dream ... The carrousel, fully functional, now resides on the National Mall, near the Air and Space Museum."--Provided by publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

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