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Mindful Day

2020

by Deborah Hopkinson and Shirley Ng-Benitez

"From the sounds of a bird greeting the morning sun to the rising of a silver moon at bedtime, a young girl experiences “a mindful day” from start to finish Want to turn a dull day into a wonderful day? Make it a mindful day! When we slow down and pay close attention, we learn what it means to be mindful. In Mindful Day, early readers follow along as a young girl brings this special kind of attention to the various activities of her day with her family. Through Hopkinson’s lyrical narrative and Ng-Benitez’s delightful illustrations, kids will explore feelings such as gratitude and love, learn how our breathing can calm our bodies, and discover how remarkable every moment can be when we experience it as fully as possible. Mindful Day also shares positive examples like being patient, appreciating the little things, and showing empathy, while giving children their first introduction to the life-changing skill of mindfulness." -- publisher

Any Child

Carter reads the newspaper

2019

by Deborah Hopkinson and Don Tate

Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well.--Provided by the publisher

Beautiful Life Biography Oppression & Resilience

Under the quilt of night

2005

by Deborah Hopkinson and James Ransome

A young girl flees from the farm where she has been worked as a slave and uses the Underground Railroad to escape to freedom in the north. Award-winning duo Deborah Hopkinson and James E. Ransome combine their talents once more for this sequel to the best-selling Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt. Traveling late one night, a runaway slave girl spies a quilt hanging outside a house. The quilt's center is a striking deep blue -- a sign that the people inside are willing to help her escape. Can she bravely navaigate the complex world of the Underground Railroad and lead her family to freedom?

Cross Group Oppression & Resilience

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