Collection: Multiracial Families

Here is a selection of books from our collection depicting diverse and multiracial families. These titles are only a sample of what you can find in our full collection. To see more, use the filtered search on the left-hand bar: go to “Content” and click “Diverse Family.” (See also “Adoption” for a list of multicultural picture books with adopted characters.)

The case for Loving

2015

by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls

Imagine not being able to marry the person you loved, just because they were of a race different from your own. This is the story of one brave family: Mildred Loving, Richard Perry Loving, and their three children. It is the story of how Mildred and Richard fell in love, and got married in Washington D.C. When they moved back to their hometown in Virginia, they were arrested for violating that state's law against interracial marriage. The Lovings refused to allow their children to get the message that their parents' love was wrong and so they fought the unfair law, taking their case all the way to the Supreme Court

Cross Group Oppression
















Mixed me

2013

by Tiffany Catledge and Anissa Rivière

"Little Mixie wonders why everyone wants to know WHAT she is. Isn't it obvious? She is clearly a human being. And anyway, isn't WHO she is what matters most? Coming from a family with a black dad and a white mom makes her extra special, and maybe a little different too. But different is good. Mixie embraces her uniqueness and determines to be the best "Me" she can be--Cover, p. [4]

Beautiful Life


Happy in our skin

2015

by Fran Manushkin and Lauren Tobia

Bouquets of babies sweet to hold: cocoa-brown, cinnamon, and honey gold. Ginger-coloured babies, peaches and cream, too--splendid skin for me, splendid skin for you! A delightfully rhythmical read-aloud text is paired with bright, bustling art from the award-winning Lauren Tobia, illustrator of Anna Hibiscus, in this joyful exploration of the new skin of babyhood. A wonderful gift book for new mums and toddlers; all children can see themselves, and open their eyes to the world around them, in this sweet, scrumptious celebration of skin in all its many, many, wonderful forms

Race/Culture Concepts