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A First Time for Everything

“Dan’s always been a good kid. But being a good kid doesn’t stop him from being bullied and feeling like he’s invisible, which is why he has low expectations when his parents send him on a class trip to Europe.

At first, he’s right. Stuck with the same girls from his middle school who love to make fun of him, Dan doesn’t know why his teacher insisted he come on this trip. But as he travels through France, Germany, Switzerland, and England, a series of first experiences begin to change him—first Fanta, first fondue, first time stealing a bike from German punk rockers . . . and first love.” — publisher […]

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How Kids Play Around the World

“Children like to play above all else, either alone or with friends. But how and what they play varies from place to place. Would you like to know about games played in Africa, New Zealand, South America, or Vietnam? This book will show you that some games are pretty much the same wherever you go, while others are completely different and unfamiliar.

In each chapter a local kid poses as a guide who introduces us to the typical and most popular games and plays of a certain country or culture. Kids will learn that every nation likes to have fun in their own way and that difference is what makes each culture special.” — publisher […]

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I Can Be All Three

“When it’s Multicultural Day at school, a young girl wonders how best to tell the story of who she is. With marigolds, mangoes, and stories of India? Fairy tales, cuckoo clocks, and German tales? Or cheeseburgers, superheroes, and American traditions?

When choosing only one doesn’t feel quite right, she realizes that stories from all three places make her who she is. With whole worlds inside her, she doesn’t have to choose just one—she can be all three.” — publisher […]

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Nigeria Jones

“Warrior Princess. That’s what Nigeria Jones’s father calls her. He has raised her as part of the Movement, a Black separatist group based in Philadelphia. Nigeria is homeschooled and vegan and participates in traditional rituals to connect her and other kids from the group to their ancestors. But when her mother—the perfect matriarch of their Movement—disappears, Nigeria’s world is upended. She finds herself taking care of her baby brother and stepping into a role she doesn’t want.

Nigeria’s mother had secrets. She wished for a different life for her children, which includes sending her daughter to a private Quaker school outside of their strict group. Despite her father’s disapproval, Nigeria attends the school with her cousin, Kamau, and Sage, who used to be a friend. ­There, she begins to flourish and expand her universe.

As Nigeria searches for her mother, she starts to uncover a shocking truth. One that will lead her to question everything she thought she knew about her life and her family.” — publisher […]

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Iveliz Explains It All

“Seventh grade is going to be Iveliz’s year. She’s going to make a new friend, help her abuela Mimi get settled after moving from Puerto Rico, and she is not going to get into any more trouble at school. . . .

Except is that what happens? Of course not. Because no matter how hard Iveliz tries, sometimes people say things that just make her so mad. And worse, Mimi keeps saying Iveliz’s medicine is unnecessary—even though it helps Iveliz feel less sad. But how do you explain your feelings to others when you’re not even sure what’s going on yourself?” — publisher […]

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Luli and the Language of Tea

“Though they may speak different languages, kids from all over the world come together to enjoy the shared pastime of tea in this delicious book for young readers. When five-year-old Luli joins her new English as a Second Language class, the playroom is quiet. Luli can’t speak English, neither can anyone else. That’s when she has a brilliant idea to host a tea party and bring them all together.

Luli removes her teapot, thermos, and teacups from her bag and calls out “Chá!” in her native Chinese. One by one, her classmates pipe up in recognition: in Russian, Hindi, Turkish, Persian, Arabic, and Spanish, Portuguese, and Swahili. Tea is a tasty language they all know well, and it gives them a chance to share and enjoy each other’s company. When all the tea is gone and it’s time for dessert, Luli gets to use her favorite English word, cookie! After that, the playroom isn’t so quiet.” — publisher […]

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I am Frida Kahlo

“The famous Mexican painter Frida Kahlo is the 23rd hero in the New York Times bestselling picture book biography series for ages 5 to 8.

Includes a foil mirror!

The free-spirited Frida Kahlo survived childhood polio and a terrible bus accident to become one of the most beloved artists in the world. Her subject was the thing she knew best: herself. On her canvases, she depicted her Mexican homeland, her pets, and even her pain. Today, she continues to be admired for the exquisite honesty of her work and for being unafraid to do things differently.” — publisher […]

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The Rabbi and the Reverend

“A timely tale of Black and white Americans working together for a cause.

When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington, he did not stand alone. He was joined by Rabbi Joachim Prinz, a refugee from Nazi Germany, who also addressed the crowd. Though Rabbi Prinz and Dr. King came from very different backgrounds, they were united by a shared belief in justice. And they knew that remaining silent in the face of injustice was wrong. Together, they spoke up and fought for a better future.” — publisher […]

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The Singer and the Scientist

“A little known story about the friendship between the great singer and the great scientist, Marian Anderson and Albert Einstein, and a lesson that true friendship knows no bounds.
It’s 1937, and Marian Anderson is one of the most famous singers in America. But after she gives a performance for an all-white audience, she learns that the nearby hotel is closed to African Americans. She doesn’t know where she’ll stay for the night.

Until the famous scientist Albert Einstein invites her to stay at his house. Marian, who endures constant discrimination as a Black performer, learns that Albert faced prejudice as a Jew in Germany. She discovers their shared passion for music—and their shared hopes for a more just world.” — publisher […]

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Accordionly

“Three accordions, two grandpas, one family!
When both grandpas, Abuelo and Opa, visit at the same time, they can’t understand each other’s language and there is a lot of silence. The grandson’s clever thinking helps find a way for everyone to share the day together as two cultures become one family. This unique book includes a bonus fold-out and a note from the author sharing the true story of his own family.” — publisher […]

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