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Our collection of picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL a recommendation.* Click here for more on book evaluation.


COVID-19 Info.: Our collection is currently not circulating. Ladd library is closed and Interlibrary Loan (ILL) is unavailable until further notice. You may also find inactive links to the Bates Library Catalog and MARC record on certain book pages. We appreciate your patience.

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A promise is a promise

2019

by Michael Kusugak, Robert N. Munsch and Vladyana Krykorka

"When Allashua disobeys her parents and goes fishing on the sea ice, she has to use her wits to escape the Qallupilluit--the troll-like creatures her parents have always warned her about that live beneath the frozen surface of the sea. But the only way to break out of their grasp is through an exchange: Allashua can go free if she brings her brothers and sisters back to the sea ice instead. Allashua doesn't want to give them up, but what can she do? After all, a promise is a promise. A Promise Is a Promise is a collaboration between award-winning storyteller Michael Kusugak and celebrated children's author Robert Munsch. This 30th anniversary edition brings all of the tension of the traditional Inuit story to a new generation of readers. Added features include a new foreword by Michael Kusugak on his role as a storyteller and the importance of storytelling in Inuit culture."--

Beautiful Life

A ride to remember

2019

by Sharon Langley and Amy Nathan

"When Sharon Langley was born, amusement parks were segregated, and African American families were not allowed in. This picture book tells how a community came together- -both black and white--to make a change. In the summer of 1963, because of demonstrations and public protests the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Maryland became desegregated and opened to all for the first time. Sharon and her parents were the first African American family to walk into the park, and Sharon was the first African American child to ride the merry-go-round. This was on the same day of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Sharon's ride to remember demonstrated the possibilities of King's dream ... The carrousel, fully functional, now resides on the National Mall, near the Air and Space Museum."--Provided by publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

A taste of the world

2019

by Beth Walrond

Takes children on a culinary journey around the world, teaching them about new cultures and landscapes through different foods. This illustrated non-fiction book explains facts with interesting references and stories that spark curiosity about the different history and cultures of the world. As children learn about foods, they also understand how the environment and cultural practice can shape the way we eat. By the end, they will have learned about different cuisines and cultures with a thought about how we all share these widely today

Informational Race/Culture Concepts

A tour of Hong Kong

2019

by Hsin-Yu (Joyce) Sun

"This visually rich and detailed wordless picture book explores the bustling urban center of Hong Kong through the eyes of two children—each starting their journey on different sides of the book and intersecting in the middle. Young readers will delight in finding the girl with her red balloon and the boy with his scruffy dog carefully tucked into the drawings. How children read the book—front to back or back to front—will change their focus and perspective on this world-famous place." -- publisher

Any Child

Abuelita’s secret

2019

by Alma Flor Ada and Jacobo Muñiz

"A boy is living with his abuelita while his father is away. He dreads the first day at a new school because he has nothing special to share about himself. Each family member offers him an object that represents a memory from the summer, but the boy doesn’t think any of these is interesting. Then his abuelita whispers a secret in his ear. Whenever it’s his turn to talk, all he needs to do is open his backpack. When the moment arrives, he dumps the backpack’s contents onto the table. As his classmates pick up the objects, he retells the stories they represent. Suddenly, he is surprised that he has much to say. And when he returns home, his abuelita has an even bigger surprise." -- publisher

Any Child

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