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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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The dreaded ogress of the tundra

2015

by Neil Christopher and Larry MacDougall

"This revised, expanded edition, originally published as Stories of the Amautalik, shares two spine-tingling tales of the dreaded ogress of the tundra, a creature that carries away unsuspecting children on her back! New illustrations in this edition ring the amautalik to life in even greater, creepier detail than the original. Revised text and additional content make this new edition a must-buy for young readers who are intrigued with the dark and dreaded beings of Inuit mythology!"--|cProvided by publisher

The legend of lightning & thunder

2013

by Paula Ikuutaq Rumbolt and Jo-Anne Rioux

In The Legend of Lightning and Thunder, a traditional legend that has been told in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut for centuries, two siblings resort to stealing from their fellow villagers, and inadvertently introduce lightning and thunder into the world. This beautifully illustrated traditional legend weaves together elements of an origin story and a traditional cautionary tale, giving young readers an accessible window into centuries-old Inuit mythology that is specific to the Kivalliq region of Nunavut

I am not a number

2016

by Jenny Kay Dupuis, Kathy Kacer and Gillian Newland

"A picture book based on a true story about a young First Nations girl who was sent to a residential school. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from despite the efforts of the nuns to force her to do otherwise. Based on the life of Jenny Kay Dupuis' own grandmother, I Am Not a Number brings a terrible part of Canada's history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to"--|cProvide by publisher

Oppression