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Our collection of children's picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. You can use the Search Tool below to find titles. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation.* See our related readings page for suggested tools for evaluating books.


You can find titles by typing a keyword into the search bar below (e.g. adoption, birthday, holidays, princess, dinosaur, etc.), or by selecting one or a combo of filters on the left.

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Nanook

2018

by Larry Hulsey

Nanook and his father Babook are Inuits living in the Alaskan tundra. Their story is set in the 1940’s, when Nanook was just twelve years old, and hunting and fishing were the only way to feed his family. Nanook watches as his father prepares for a fishing trip and is excited when Babook decides he’s finally old enough to go off on his own. Before he goes, Babook warns Nanook to stay in Big Bend, a safe area free from bears. However, Nanook ignores his father’s warning, roams too far, and soon finds himself in a dangerous situation. When Babook rescues him, he demonstrates a father’s unconditional love, and Nanook learns a valuable lesson. --publisher

Folklore

Let ‘er buck!

2019

by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson and Gordon C. James

"African American George Fletcher loved horses from an early age. When he unfairly lost the 1911 Pendleton Round-Up to a white man, the outraged audience declared him "people's champion"--Provided by publisher

Biography Cross Group Oppression & Resilience

The ghost dance

2016

by Alice McLerran and Paul Morin

The bountiful world of their ancestors was no more -- the result of white settlers' relentless westward movement in the U.S. A Paiute visionary, Tavibo, and his son each dreamed that if Native peoples danced, the white people would disappear and the ghosts of the wildlife that had been decimated would return. The ghost dance movement began in the U.S. in the 1800s, in hope as native peoples came together to dance for their shared dream. The dream failed and they tried again. Again the dream failed tragically. But the vision and the dream still call out to all people, envisioning a future when all Indian peoples would be united, disease would vanish, and the earth would be regenerated and restored. --publisher's site

Oppression & Resilience

Indian boyhood

2016

by Charles A. Eastman and Heidi M. Rasch

Imagine a childhood full of adventure. Where riding horses, playing in the woods, and hunting for food was part of everyday life; where a grizzly bear, a raccoon, or a squirrel was your favorite pet. Such was the childhood of American Indian author Charles Eastman, or Ohiyesa (1858- 1939). Michael Oren Fitzgerald adapts Eastman's 1902 memoir of his childhood, Indian Boyhood for a younger audience. Eastman was born in a buffalo hide tipi in western Minnesota and raised until age fifteen in the traditional Dakota Sioux manner. He was then transplanted into the "white man's" world, where he went on to become a medical doctor, field secretary for the YMCA, and co- founder of the Boy Scouts of America.

Biography

47,000 beads

2017

by Angel Adeyoha, Koja Adeyoha and Holly McGillis

Peyton loves to dance, and especially at pow wow, but her Auntie notices that she's been dancing less and less. When Peyton shares that she just can't be comfortable wearing a dress anymore, Auntie Eyota asks some friends for help to get Peyton what she needs. |cPage 4 of cover

Beautiful Life

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