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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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      Emma’s gift

      2014

      by Deborah L. Delaronde, Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm and Jay Odjick

      Emma wants to participate in her community's annual 'King's Day' celebration that is held every year on January 6th. She loves to see the gifts that are given and hear the stories people tell when they visit. Her mother, however, feels that Emma is too young. When Emma's grandmother hurts herself, Emma reluctantly agrees to help. In helping her grandmother prepare and serve her King's Day meal, Emma discovers the meaning behind this special day. 'King's Day' is about celebrating Christ's birth and the Three Wise Kings who visited the baby Jesus bearing gifts on this holy day. Emma learns that 'King's Day' is not only about exchanging gifts, it's also about helping family and friends by giving one's time.-- Publisher's website

      Beautiful Life

      The old ways

      2014

      by Susan Margaret Chapman and John Mantha

      "Simon loves his grandparents but they are stuck in their 'old ways.' Simon can't imagine what is so great about building igloos and listening to his grandmother's time- worn tales. It may take more than a little persuasion to interest him in both. In fact, it takes a blizzard and a broken engine to show Simon that the old ways are far more interesting-- and useful-- than any television show or video game could be"--Jacket flap

      Beautiful Life

      Which way should I go?

      2007

      by Sylvia Olsen, Kasia Charko and Ron Martin

      Joey is a happy Nuu-chah-nulth boy, eager to help and quick to see the bright side of things. But when he loses his beloved grandmother, the sun goes out in his world. Fortunately, she has left something of herself behind a song, which keeps knocking on Joey's heart, and a dance, which urges him to get up on his feet and choose again

      Beautiful Life

      Wild eggs

      2015

      by Suzie Napayok-Short and Jonathan Wright

      Akuluk is not excited about visiting her grandparents in Nunavut. She would rather head south for summer vacation, somewhere with roller coasters and cotton candy. There can't be much to do way up there, Akuluk figures. But as soon as she steps off the plane and sees all the exciting animals that the tundra has to offer, Akuluk forgets all about her dreams of going south. On her first full day in Nunavut, she can't wait to travel out on the land with her grandfather to hunt for wild eggs. As she learns about the different types of eggs, how to collect them properly, and the delicious meals that can be prepared with them, Akuluk knows that this is just the beginning of the exciting things she'll learn about the Arctic

      Beautiful Life Folklore

      The dreaded ogress of the tundra

      2015

      by Neil Christopher and Larry MacDougall

      "This revised, expanded edition, originally published as Stories of the Amautalik, shares two spine-tingling tales of the dreaded ogress of the tundra, a creature that carries away unsuspecting children on her back! New illustrations in this edition ring the amautalik to life in even greater, creepier detail than the original. Revised text and additional content make this new edition a must-buy for young readers who are intrigued with the dark and dreaded beings of Inuit mythology!"--|cProvided by publisher

      The legend of lightning & thunder

      2013

      by Paula Ikuutaq Rumbolt and Jo-Anne Rioux

      In The Legend of Lightning and Thunder, a traditional legend that has been told in the Kivalliq region of Nunavut for centuries, two siblings resort to stealing from their fellow villagers, and inadvertently introduce lightning and thunder into the world. This beautifully illustrated traditional legend weaves together elements of an origin story and a traditional cautionary tale, giving young readers an accessible window into centuries-old Inuit mythology that is specific to the Kivalliq region of Nunavut