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Our comprehensive collection of children's picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. You can use the search tool below to find titles. *Note: Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested tools for evaluating books.


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    Cool melons–turn to frogs!

    2017

    by Matthew Gollub, Issa Kobayashi and Kazuko G. Stone

    For hundreds of years, school children in Japan have been introduced to poetry through the work of Issa. Born in 1763 on a farm in central Japan, Issa began writing poetry as a young child, inspired by his deep love for the natural world. Later in his boyhood and throughout his life, poetry was also Issa's refuge in times of joy and in times of suffering. Matthew Gollub's poignant rendering of Issa's life and over thirty of his best-loved poems, along with Kazuko Stone's sensitive and humorous watercolor paintings, make Cool Melons a classic introduction to Issa's work for readers of all ages. With authentic Japanese calligraphy, a detailed Afterword, and exhaustive research by both author and illustrator, this is also an inspirational book about haiku, writing, nature, and life.

    Biography

    Malala Yousafzai

    2019

    by Karen Leggett Abouraya and Susan L. Roth

    Growing up in the Swat Valley of Pakistan, Malala Yousafzai loved books and school. But in 2009, the Taliban came to power and closed all schools for girls. Malala, just eleven years old, began to speak and blog about the right of all children to receive an education. Soon fighting broke out and Malala's family fled the Swat Valley. After the fighting ceased, they returned home, and Malala continued to speak out. That's when she was shot by a Taliban gunman, but her life-threatening injury only strengthened Malala's resolve. In 2013, just nine months after being attacked, Malala addressed the United Nations about the right of every child to receive an education, and in 2014, she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. At age seventeen, she was the youngest person ever to receive this honor. This book is more than a biography of a brave, outspoken girl who continues to fight for the millions of children worldwide who are not able to go to school. It is also a testament to the power of education to change the world for girls and boys everywhere.

    Biography Oppression

    Grand Canyon

    2017

    by Jason Chin

    A river winds through the landscape, eroding the rock for millions of years, shaping a cavity in the ground 277 miles long, as much as 18 miles wide, and more than a mile deep known as ... Grand Canyon. Home to an astonishing variety of plants and animals that live within its walls, Grand Canyon is much more than just a hole in the ground. Follow a father and daughter as they make their way through this wondrous place, discovering life both present and past. Weave in and out of time as perfectly placed die cuts show how a fossil today was a living creature millions of years ago, often in a completely different environment.

    Informational

    Mountain chef

    2016

    by Annette Bay Pimentel and Rich Lo

    Tie Sing was born in the mountains. The mountains were in his blood. But because he was of Chinese descent at a time in America when to be Chinese meant working in restaurants or laundries, Tie Sing's prospects were limited. But he had bigger plans. He began cooking for mapmakers and soon built a reputation as the best trail cook in California. When millionaire Stephen Mather began his quest to create a national park service in 1915, he invited a group of influential men -- writers, tycoons, members of Congress, and even a movie star -- to go camping in the Sierras. Tie Sing was hired to cook. Tie Sing planned diligently. He understood the importance of this trip. But when disaster struck -- twice! -- and Tie Sing's supplies were lost, it was his creative spirit and quick mind that saved the day. His sumptuous menus had to be struck and Tie Sing had to start over in order to feed the thirty people in the group for ten whole days. His skills were tested and Tie Sing rose to the challenge. On the last night, he fed not just the campers' bodies, but also their minds, reminding them to remember and protect the mountains

    Biography Cross Group Oppression

    Many of the cover images on this site are from Google Books.

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