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Our collection of picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL a recommendation.* Click here for more on book evaluation.


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43 matching books

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Character Prominence

The Big Day

2020

by Terry Lee Caruthers and Robert Casilla

"Big day ahead! Big Mama says as she wakes young Tansy. She hurries Tansy through breakfast and a bath, and dresses in her best clothes. Big Mama even wears her special brooch. What could be so special about this day? Soon enough, Tansy learns the importance: Big Mama is voting for the first time! The elation and pride of Big Mama is captured in brilliant storytelling and gorgeous watercolors, bringing this historical moment alive. The Big Day celebrates Agnes Sadler, the first Black woman to cast a vote in Knoxville, Tennessee, on September 6, 1919." -- publisher

Beautiful Life Informational

Remembering Green

2020

by Lisa Gammon Olson and Lauren Rutledge

"In the late 19th century, the United States Government began establishing Indian Residential Schools with the intent of forcibly assimilating Native American children into Euro-American culture. Wenonah, a young Ojibwe girl, will need her Great Grandfathers help to find ways she can remember her beautiful culture & indigenous identity in this time of great upheaval for her tribe." -- publisher

Beautiful Life Oppression & Resilience

Sweet Tamales for Purim

2019

by Barbara Bietz and John Kanzler

"Many Jewish families helped settle, diverse communities in the desolate, desert terrain of the Wild West. Although Sweet Tamales for Purim is a work of fiction, it is inspired by a true event. In 1886, the Hebrew Ladies Benevolent Society of Tucson planned a Purim Ball for the entire community. Barbara tells the story from the perspective of a young girl, who along with her new friend, Luis plan to create a Purim festival for their town. Their plans for the celebration were well underway until the family goat, Kitzel, ate all of the traditional holiday pastries, Hamantashen. Fortunately, they find another way to celebrate Purim and the family is able to share their cultural traditions with their new neighbors. Purim celebrates the courageous stand that Queen Esther made to save the Jewish people from being banished by the king. The young girl's determination to create a spirited Purim celebration in her western town, provides a unique insight into how children can creatively overcome challenges when life doesn’t go as planned. Her quick thinking, persistence and resourceful actions give their first Purim festival added significance." -- publisher

Beautiful Life Cross Group Incidental

Sing a Song

2019

by Kelly Starling Lyons and Keith Mallett

"In Jacksonville, Florida, two brothers, one of them the principal of a segregated, all-black school, wrote the song “Lift Every Voice and Sing” so his students could sing it for a tribute to Abraham Lincoln’s birthday in 1900. From that moment on, the song has provided inspiration and solace for generations of Black families. Mothers and fathers passed it on to their children who sang it to their children and grandchildren. Known as the Black National Anthem, it has been sung during major moments of the Civil Rights Movement and at family gatherings and college graduations." --publisher

Beautiful Life Folklore Oppression & Resilience

Tashi and the Tibetan flower cure

2016

by Naomi C. Rose

"Tashi loves listening to Popola, her grandpa, sing Tibetan chants to the click, click of his prayer beads. She also loves hearing Popola's stories about the village in Tibet where he grew up. But recently Popola has been sick, and Tashi is worried. One of the stories Tashi remembers told how people in Popola's village use flowers to help themselves recover from illnesses. Will this healing tradition work in the United States, so far from Popola's village? Determined to help Popola get better, Tashi recruits family, friends, and neighbors in a grand effort to find out." --Publisher's website

Beautiful Life

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