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Our collection of picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL a recommendation.* Click here for more on book evaluation.


COVID-19 Info: Currently, our collection is only available via Interlibrary Loan (ILL). However, we appreciate your patience as these services are still limited and you may find inactive links to the Bates Library Catalog and MARC record on certain book pages.

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45 matching books

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Sewing stories

2015

by Barbara Herkert and Vanessa Brantley-Newton

"Harriet Powers learned to sew and quilt as a young slave girl on a Georgia plantation. She lived through the Civil War and Reconstruction, and eventually owned a cotton farm with her family, all the while relying on her skills with the needle to clothe and feed her children. Later she began making pictorial quilts, using each square to illustrate Bible stories and local legends. She exhibited her quilts at local cotton fairs, and though she never traveled outside of Georgia, her quilts are now priceless examples of African American folk art."--Amazon.com

Beautiful Life Biography Oppression & Resilience

Brave ballerina

2019

by Michelle Meadows

Janet Collins wanted to be a ballerina in the 1930s and 40s, a time when racial segregation was widespread in the United States. From her early childhood lessons to the height of her success as the first African-American prima ballerina in the Metropolitan Opera, this is the story of a remarkable pioneer. Full color

Beautiful Life Biography Oppression & Resilience

Carter reads the newspaper

2019

by Deborah Hopkinson and Don Tate

Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well.--Provided by the publisher

Beautiful Life Biography Oppression & Resilience

The elephant keeper

2017

by Margriet Ruurs and Pedro Covo

"In 14-year-old Aaron's village in Zambia, poaching for ivory is common practice, and elephants are feared because of the danger they pose to humans and the damage they often cause to crops so important to the villagers' livelihoods. But when Aaron encounters a newborn elephant in distress, his instinct is not to run away, but to jump to its rescue. This is the beginning of a beautiful bond of friendship and a meaningful vocation. This moving story, written by Margriet Ruurs and stunningly illustrated by Pedro Covo, is inspired by the true story of Aaron and Zambezi-a teenage Zambian boy and an orphaned baby elephant that was rescued from a swimming pool at a holiday lodge. Aaron had been a casual laborer, just trying to make enough money to support his family, but when gamekeepers noticed his natural ability to care for animals, he was offered a job as an elephant keeper at the Lilayi Elephant Nursery, where his still works to this day. Zambezi was only one month old when he was found nearly drowning in a holiday lodge swimming pool. His mother had been killed by poachers and he'd been separated from his herd. Severely dehydrated, he'd tried to drink from the pool and had fallen in. Now Zambezi is nearly 6 years old and is doing very well. This unique informational picture book for middle-graders includes three non-fiction spreads, which provide intervals in the story and opportunities for classroom discussions. These spreads feature photos as well as information about elephants, poaching and the amazing work that is done at an elephant orphanage. At the end of the book there are suggestions for ways readers can help the cause"-- |cProvided by publisher

Beautiful Life Biography

The quilts of Gee’s Bend

2017

by Susan Goldman Rubin

"In the rural community of Gee's Bend, Alabama, African American women have been making quilts for generations. Taught by their mothers, grandmothers, and aunts, these women use scraps of old overalls, aprons, bleached cornmeal sacks--anything they can find. The mere scraps are then transformed into spectacular works of art, each one displaying a unique pattern with vibrant colors and complex geometric composition. Over the years, the women made quilts to keep their families warm and comfortable, never imagining that someday their work would hang on museum walls. Much to their surprise, many of the quilts were featured in an exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, in 2002, which then traveled to the Whitney Museum in New York City. Soon enough, the whole world became acquainted with the quilts and the amazing women who created them. In this look at the close-knit community of Gee's Bend, award-winning author Susan Goldman Rubin explores the history of an extraordinary group of women and their unique art"--Dust jacket

Beautiful Life Informational

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