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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring Indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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Fishing with grandma

2015

by Susan Avingaq, Charlene Chua and Maren Vsetula

"Adventure begins when Grandma takes her two grandchildren out for a trip on the lake. After showing the kids how to prepare of a fishing trip, Grandma and the kids enjoy a day of jigging in the ice for fish. Grandma shows them everything they need to know to complete a successful fishing trip, from what clothes to wear, to how to drill and clear holes in the ice, to how to make a traditional Inuit jigging rod. By the end of the day, the kids have a yummy meal of Arctic char, and they have also learned everything they need to know to have a successful day on the lake."--Provided by publisher

Beautiful Life

How Nivi got her names

2016

by Laura Deal and Charlene Chua

Nivi has always known that her names are special, but she does not know where they came from. So, one sunny afternoon, Nivi decides to ask her mom how she got her names. The stories of the people Nivi is named after lead her to an understanding of traditional Inuit naming practices and knowledge of what those practices mean to Inuit. How Nivi Got Her Names is an easy-to-understand introduction to traditional Inuit naming, with a story that touches on Inuit custom adoption [an adoption in which a pregnant woman provides her child to someone who needs a child].

Beautiful Life

Elisapee and her baby seagull

2017

by Nancy Mike and Charlene Chua

"When Elisapee's father brings home a baby seagull, Elisapee falls in love with the bird right away. She feeds and cares for her new friend, named Nau, and even helps Nau learn how to fly! Nau grows, and grows, and grows some more, until she's big enough to fly all over town and play with the other seagulls. Soon, it seems like Nau is ready to leave home for good, and Elisapee has to learn how to say goodbye. Based on the author's childhood experience, this charming story about learning to care for animals will delight young readers." --|cProvided by publisher

Any Child

Our first caribou hunt

2015

by Jennifer Noah, Chris Giroux and Hwei Lim

"A sweet and simple introduction to Inuit hunting practices and the proper treatment of game. Nutaraq and Simonie are eager to go on their first hunting trip with their father. As they load up their snow machine and sled for the trip, Nutaraq hopes that she will be able to catch her first caribou that weekend, with some help from her dad. But when the trip nears its end and Nutaraq still hasn't caught her first caribou, she tries her very hardest to follow all of her father's advice about how Inuit traditionally hunted on the land"--|cProvided by publisher

Beautiful Life

When I was eight

2013

by Christy Jordan-Fenton, Gabrielle Grimard and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton

Based on the true story of Margaret Pokiak-Fenton, this book chronicles the unbreakable spirit of an Inuit girl while attending an Arctic residential school. Olemaun is eight and knows a lot of things. But she does not know how to read. Ignoring her father’s warnings, she travels far from her Arctic home to the outsiders’ school to learn. The nuns at the school call her Margaret. They cut off her long hair and force her to do menial chores, but she remains undaunted. Her tenacity draws the attention of a black-cloaked nun who tries to break her spirit at every turn. But the young girl is more determined than ever to learn how to read.

Cross Group Oppression

An Inuksuk means welcome

2015

by Mary Wallace

An inuksuk is a stone landmark that different peoples of the Arctic region build to leave a symbolic message. Inuksuit (the plural of inuksuk) can point the way, express joy, or simply say: welcome. A central image in Inuit culture, the inuksuk frames this picture book as an acrostic: readers will learn seven words from the Inuktitut language whose first letters together spell INUKSUK. Each word is presented in English and in Inuktitut characters, with phonetic pronunciation guides provided. --Publisher

Race/Culture Concepts

Not my girl

2014

by Christy Jordan-Fenton, Gabrielle Grimard and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton

Two years ago, Margaret left her Arctic home for the outsiders' school. Now she has returned and can barely contain her excitement as she rushes towards her waiting family -- but her mother stands still as a stone. This strange, skinny child, with her hair cropped short, can't be her daughter. "Not my girl!" she says angrily. Margaret's years at school have changed her. Now ten years old, she has forgotten her language and the skills to hunt and fish. She can't even stomach her mother's food. Her only comfort is in the books she learned to read at school

Beautiful Life Biography

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