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Our collection of picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL a recommendation.* Click here for more on book evaluation.


COVID-19 Info: Currently, our collection is only available via Interlibrary Loan (ILL). However, we appreciate your patience as these services are still limited and you may find inactive links to the Bates Library Catalog and MARC record on certain book pages.

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4 matching books

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The emancipation of grandpa Sandy Wills

2016

by Cheryl Wills and Randell Pearson

In a one-of-a-kind brilliantly illustrated children's book that's based on a true story, veteran television journalist Cheryl Wills tells a powerful tale about her enslaved ancestor who fought for his freedom as a soldier during The Civil War. Overflowing with lessons of perseverance and the power of one's imagination, the book also meets common core standards, includes depth of knowledge questions and a handy glossary. Edited by an Ivy -league educated and award winning teacher, The Emancipation of Grandpa Sandy Wills is a story that students and teachers alike will cherish for the entire school year. Young readers will be captivated by the emotional narrative which is spun from Cheryl's real-life career as a television anchor who researches what turns out to be her biggest scoop ever: tracking down her great- great-great grandfather Sandy Wills --

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Someday is now

2018

by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich and Jade Johnson

Presents the life of Clara Luper, an African-American teacher and local civil rights leader who taught her students about equality and led them in lunch counter sit-in demonstrations in Oklahoma City in 1958.

Biography Cross Group Oppression & Resilience

Hey, Charleston!

2013

by Anne F. Rockwell and Colin Bootman

"What happened when a former slave took beat-up old instruments and gave them to a bunch of orphans? Thousands of futures got a little brighter and a great American art form was born. In 1891, Reverend Daniel Joseph Jenkins opened his orphanage in Charleston, South Carolina. He soon had hundreds of children and needed a way to support them. Jenkins asked townspeople to donate old band instruments - some of which had last played in the hands of Confederate soldiers in the Civil War. He found teachers to show the kids how to play. Soon the orphanage had a band. And what a band it was. The Jenkins Orphanage Band caused a sensation on the streets of Charleston. People called the band's style of music "rag" - a rhythm inspired by the African-American people who lived on the South Carolina and Georgia coast. The children performed as far away as Paris and London, and they earned enough money to support the orphanage that still exists today. They also helped launch the music we now know as jazz. Hey, Charleston! is the story of the kind man who gave America "some rag" and so much more"--Jacket flap

Biography

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