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Our collection of picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL a recommendation.* Click here for more on book evaluation.


COVID-19 Info: Currently, our collection is only available via Interlibrary Loan (ILL). However, we appreciate your patience as these services are still limited and you may find inactive links to the Bates Library Catalog and MARC record on certain book pages.

Find titles using a keyword search below (e.g. adoption, birthday, holidays, etc.), or by selecting one or a combination of filters on the lefthand sidebar below.

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10 matching books

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Welcoming Babies

2018

by Margy Burns Knight and Anne Sibley O'Brien

"50,000 copies sold! New Edition! Welcoming Babies draws from experiences around the world to show the diverse ways in which the human family welcomes new life. This redesigned edition features updated content and new backmatter with additional ways of welcoming babies around the world. It’s a powerful concept, exploring the routines and rituals of a child’s first year in diverse cultures and traditions and introducing readers to babies from tiny Luke, who is spending his first days of life in an incubator, to Kasa, who is being introduced to the sunrise by her grandmother. Nontraditional families—biracial, adoptive, and single-parent—are included. The ways in which babies are welcomed into the world are wonderfully varied yet strikingly kindred. Welcoming Babies is equally appropriate as a gift to new parents or grandparents and a read-aloud for babies." -- publisher

Incidental

A path of stars

2012

by Anne Sibley O'Brien

A refugee from Cambodia, Dara's beloved grandmother is grief-stricken when she learns her brother has died, and it is up to Dara to try and heal her.

Beautiful Life

Ashley Bryan

2009

by Ashley Bryan and Bill McGuinnes

"Ashley's autobiography is full of art, photographs, and the poignant never-say-never tale of his rich life, a life that has always included drawing and painting. Even as a boy growing up during the Depression, he painted -- finding cast off objects to turn into books and kites and toy and art. Even as a solder in the segregated Army on the beaches of Normandy, he sketched -- keeping charcoal crayons and paper in his gasmask to draw with during lulls. Even as a talented, visionary art student who was accepted and then turned away from college upon arrival, the school telling Ashley that to give a scholarship to an African American student would be a waste, he painted -- continuing to create art when he could have been discouraged, continuing to polish his talents when his spirit should have been beaten. Ashley went on to become a Hans Christian Anderson Award nominee, a May Hill Arbuthnot lecturer, and a multiple Coretta Scott King award winner. As you might imagine, his story is powerful, bursting with his creative energy, and a testament to believing in oneself. It's a book every child in America should have access to and it does what the very best autobiographies do; it inspires!" -- publisher

Biography

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