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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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Our first caribou hunt

2015

by Jennifer Noah, Chris Giroux and Hwei Lim

"A sweet and simple introduction to Inuit hunting practices and the proper treatment of game. Nutaraq and Simonie are eager to go on their first hunting trip with their father. As they load up their snow machine and sled for the trip, Nutaraq hopes that she will be able to catch her first caribou that weekend, with some help from her dad. But when the trip nears its end and Nutaraq still hasn't caught her first caribou, she tries her very hardest to follow all of her father's advice about how Inuit traditionally hunted on the land"--|cProvided by publisher

Beautiful Life

An Inuksuk means welcome

2015

by Mary Wallace

An inuksuk is a stone landmark that different peoples of the Arctic region build to leave a symbolic message. Inuksuit (the plural of inuksuk) can point the way, express joy, or simply say: welcome. A central image in Inuit culture, the inuksuk frames this picture book as an acrostic: readers will learn seven words from the Inuktitut language whose first letters together spell INUKSUK. Each word is presented in English and in Inuktitut characters, with phonetic pronunciation guides provided. --Publisher

Race/Culture Concepts

Not my girl

2014

by Christy Jordan-Fenton, Gabrielle Grimard and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton

Two years ago, Margaret left her Arctic home for the outsiders' school. Now she has returned and can barely contain her excitement as she rushes towards her waiting family -- but her mother stands still as a stone. This strange, skinny child, with her hair cropped short, can't be her daughter. "Not my girl!" she says angrily. Margaret's years at school have changed her. Now ten years old, she has forgotten her language and the skills to hunt and fish. She can't even stomach her mother's food. Her only comfort is in the books she learned to read at school

Beautiful Life Biography

Missuk’s snow geese

2008

by Anne Renaud and Geneviève Côté

When her father agrees to teach her how to carve snow geese out of soapstone upon his return from a hunting trip, Missuk is thrilled with the opportunity to learn his great skill, but when a snowstorm blasts the area and her father is nowhere in sight, Missuk begins to fear the worst, in a moving tale set in the land of the Northern lights

Beautiful Life

Tales from the tundra

2010

by Ibi Kaslik and Anthony Brennan

Learn why the raven is black or how a little boy was transformed into a bird. Find out why a walrus used to have antlers and how an earth spirit pulled the first caribou from the ground. These fascinating stories will capture the imagination of young readers and introduce them to the rich mythology of the Canadian Inuit