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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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    The apple tree =

    2015

    by Sandy Tharp-Thee, Wade Blevins, David Crawler, Marlena Campbell Hodson and Patrick Rochford

    A little boy plants an apple seed, and as soon as it sprouts the boy can see the apple tree it is meant to be. But the little apple tree isn't so sure. Young and impatient, the tree begins to doubt its calling, especially after apples fail to appear that first October. How can the little boy encourage the tree to give the seasons and years the time to work their magic? Includes Cherokee syllabary

    Any Child

    Native American Night before Christmas

    2010

    by Gary Robinson and Jesse T. Hummingbird

    An innovative re-telling of the classic Christmas tale, this full-color picture book takes a whimsical look at what Christmas Eve might be like for an American Indian family when Old Red Shirt (the Indian Santa Claus) comes a-calling with his team of flying white buffalo to deliver fry bread, commodities and other goodies. This delightful and very amusing rewrite of the traditional "A Night Before Christmas" is sure to be a hit with Native Americans and children everywhere as well as with people of all ages interested in Native customs and art. With full-page colorful, humorous paintings by renowned Cherokee artist Jesse T. Hummingbird.

    The Water Walker

    2017

    by Joanne Robertson

    "This is the story of a determined Ojibwe Grandmother (Nokomis) Josephine Mandamin and her great love for Nibi (Water). Nokomis walks to raise awareness of our need to protect Nibi for future generations, and for all life on the planet. She, along with other women, men, and youth, have walked around all of the Great Lakes from the four salt waters - or oceans - all the way to Lake Superior. The water walks are full of challenges, and by her example Josephine inspires and challenges us all to take up our responsibility to protect our water and our planet for all generations. Her story is a wonderful way to talk with children about the efforts that the Ojibwe and many other Indigenous peoples give to the protection of water - the giver of life"--|cProvided by publisher

    Biography

    The people shall continue

    2017

    by Simon J. Ortiz and Sharol Graves

    "The People Shall Continue was originally published in 1977. It is a story of Indigenous peoples of the Americas, specifically in the U.S., as they endeavor to live on lands they have known to be their traditional homelands from time immemorial. Even though the prairies, mountains, valleys, deserts, river bottomlands, forests, coastal regions, swamps and other wetlands across the nation are not as vast as they used to be, all of the land is still considered to be the homeland of the people"--Foreword

    Cross Group Oppression