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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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The saga of Haggle Lee Ho

2014

by J. R. Poulter and Stefania Saccarola

"Haggle Lee Ho has lived in the town all his life, grown up with those around him, but never acknowledged as one of them. That is all about to change. The town's people have a treasure in their midst. They just don't know it, yet. Sometimes, what is most precious is right under your nose!"--Back cover

Cross Group Folklore

One world together

2013

by Catherine Anholt and Laurence Anholt

Take a trip around the world, meet children from lots of different places and peek into their lives. In this story about friendship across nations and cultures, one small child visits nine different countries to find a friend -- and ends up being friends with ALL the children he meets. Along the way he discovers how children live in other countries and the things they enjoy doing, learning both how their lives are different and how many of the things children enjoy throughout the world are the same. The countries featured are Brazil, China, Russia, Kenya, the Netherlands, Sweden, Japan, Morocco, and the United States

Cross Group Race/Culture Concepts

The case for Loving

2015

by Selina Alko and Sean Qualls

Imagine not being able to marry the person you loved, just because they were of a race different from your own. This is the story of one brave family: Mildred Loving, Richard Perry Loving, and their three children. It is the story of how Mildred and Richard fell in love, and got married in Washington D.C. When they moved back to their hometown in Virginia, they were arrested for violating that state's law against interracial marriage. The Lovings refused to allow their children to get the message that their parents' love was wrong and so they fought the unfair law, taking their case all the way to the Supreme Court

Cross Group Oppression

Something to prove

2013

by Robert Skead and Floyd Cooper

In 1936, the New York Yankees wanted to test a hot prospect named Joe DiMaggio to see if he was ready for the big leagues. They knew just the ballplayer to call, Satchel Paige, the best pitcher anywhere, black or white. For the game, Paige joined a group of amateur African- American players, and they faced off against a team of white major leaguers plus young DiMaggio

Cross Group Incidental Oppression