Skip to content

Search the Collection

Our collection of picture books featuring Black and Indigenous people and People of Color (BIPOC) is available to the public. *Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL a recommendation.* Click here for more on book evaluation.


COVID-19 Info.: Our collection is currently not circulating. Ladd library is closed and Interlibrary Loan (ILL) is unavailable until further notice. You may also find inactive links to the Bates Library Catalog and MARC record on certain book pages. We appreciate your patience.

Find titles using a keyword search below (e.g. adoption, birthday, holidays, etc.), or by selecting one or a combination of filters on the lefthand sidebar below.

First time here? Start here!

271 matching books

Show Filters
x

Filter Results

Clear filters

Cross Group Sub

Immigration

Genres

Tabitha and Magoo dress up too

2020

by Michelle Tea and Ellis van der Does

"Tabitha and Magoo love to play dress up in their room. Tabitha uses her brother’s shirts to make superhero capes, and Magoo uses his sister’s frilly skirts to fashion a gown. They’re disappointed to think they can’t go outside in their new outfits, but then the gorgeous drag queen Morgana magically appears! With the help of their new friend, they learn to defy restrictive gender roles and celebrate being themselves. The trio, dressed in colorful costumes and riding in a flying car, then heads to the local library for a diverse and fun-filled story time." -- publisher

Any Child

A ride to remember

2019

by Sharon Langley and Amy Nathan

"When Sharon Langley was born, amusement parks were segregated, and African American families were not allowed in. This picture book tells how a community came together- -both black and white--to make a change. In the summer of 1963, because of demonstrations and public protests the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Maryland became desegregated and opened to all for the first time. Sharon and her parents were the first African American family to walk into the park, and Sharon was the first African American child to ride the merry-go-round. This was on the same day of Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Sharon's ride to remember demonstrated the possibilities of King's dream ... The carrousel, fully functional, now resides on the National Mall, near the Air and Space Museum."--Provided by publisher

Biography Oppression & Resilience

Carter reads the newspaper

2019

by Deborah Hopkinson and Don Tate

Carter G. Woodson was born ten years after the end of the Civil War, to parents who had both been enslaved. Their stories were not the ones written about in history books, but Carter learned them and kept them in his heart. Carter's father could not read or write, but he believed in being an informed citizen. So Carter read the newspaper to him every day, and from this practice, he learned about the world and how to find out what he didn't know. Many years later, when he was a student at Harvard University (the second African-American and the only child of enslaved parents to do so), one of his professors said that black people had no history. Carter knew that wasn't true--and he set out to make sure the rest of us knew as well.--Provided by the publisher

Beautiful Life Biography Oppression & Resilience

Grandpa stops a war

2019

by Susan Robeson and Rod Brown

""Daddy always said it takes a man of peace to stop a war." Based on the true story of Paul Robeson's visit to the front lines of the Spanish Civil War, comes this recollection of his bravery and activism by his granddaughter, Susan Robeson, with her debut book. When Susan was a child her father and grandfather told her family stories over and over. Grandpa Paul was a great man, a singer with a deep and rumbling voice, a man of peace and principle who worried about the safety of the children and families living in countries at war. His songs were always full of emotion, and evoking the African-American spirituals of his own father's childhood, he was able to communicate even with people who didn't speak the same language. Though it was dangerous, Robeson went to Spain and traveled to the front lines of the war (in a Buick!). There, he asked the soldiers to set up speakers facing the fighters on both sides of the battlefield. And then he sang.... With gorgeous illustrations from the fine artist Rod Brown, When Grandpa Stops A War celebrates the activism and achievements of the great Paul Robeson, and shows readers the power of art in times of discord and war."--Provided by publisher

Biography Cross Group Oppression & Resilience

I am farmer

2019

by Baptiste Paul, Miranda Paul and Elizabeth Zunon

Discover the true story of how environmentalist Farmer Tantoh is transforming the landscape in his home country of Cameroon. When Tantoh Nforba was a child, his fellow students mocked him for his interest in gardening. Today he's an environmental hero, bringing clean water and bountiful gardens to the central African nation of Cameroon. Authors Miranda Paul and Baptiste Paul share Farmer Tantoh's inspiring story.

Biography

Many of the cover images on this site are from Google Books.
Using Tiny Framework Log in

STAY UP-TO-DATE ABOUT TRENDS IN MULTICULTURAL PICTURE BOOKS!

Sign up for our newsletter and get a FREE

color poster of our unique picture book categories