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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring Indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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Secret recipe box

by Helal Musleh

Maha's grandma is moving from Palestine to Canada, and Maha can't wait! Teta travels from far away with a box full of secret recipes and special memories. Maha wants to keep them all for herself, but Teta's kindness teaches her the value of sharing, and the joy of connecting with loved ones. -- publisher's site

Beautiful Life

A walk on the shoreline

2015

by Rebecca Hainnu and Qin Leng

Young Nukappia can't wait to get out to his family campsite on the shoreline. After spending all year in the south with his adoptive parents, Nukappia always looks forward to his summer visits with his birth family. After spending one night in town, Nukappia and his uncle Angu begin the long walk down the shore to the family summer campsite, where all of Nukappia's cousins and aunts and uncles are waiting for him. Along the way, Nukappia learns that the shoreline is not just ice and rocks and water. There is an entire ecosystem of plants and animals that call the shoreline home. From seaweed to clams to char to shore grasses, there is far more to see along the shoreline than Nukappia ever imagined. |cProvided by publisher

Beautiful Life Informational

Only in My Hometown / Kisimi taimaippaktut angirrarijarani

2017

by Angnakuluk Friesen, Ippiksaut Friesen and Jean Kusugak

The northern lights shine, women gather to eat raw caribou meat and everyone could be family in this ode to small-town life in Nunavut, written in English and Inuktitut. Sisters Angnakuluk Friesen and Ippiksaut Friesen collaborate on this story about what it's like to grow up in an Inuit community in Nunavut. Every line about the hometown in this book will have readers thinking about what makes their own hometowns unique. With strong social studies curriculum connections, Only in My Hometown introduces young readers to life in the Canadian North, as well as the Inuit language and culture. Angnakuluk's simple text, translated into Inuktitut and written out in syllabics and transliterated roman characters, is complemented by Ippiksaut's warm paintings of their shared hometown.

Beautiful Life

A day with Yayah

2018

by Nicola I. Campbell and Julie Flett

On an outing in Nicola Valley, British Columbia, a First Nations family forages for herbs and mushrooms while the grandmother passes down her language and knowledge to her young grandchildren. Includes glossary

Beautiful Life

A man called Raven

1997

by Richard Van Camp and George Littlechild

A mysterious man tells two Indian brothers why they must not hurt the ravens that pester them

Beautiful Life

Jon’s Tricky Journey / Jaan aullaqsimanirijanga

2017

by Patricia McCarthy, Hwei Lim and Jeela Palluq-Cloutier

"Jon loves his life in the North. But when he feels a pain that won't go away, he must go to a children's hospital in the south to find out what is wrong. A doctor there tells Jon he has cancer and will have to stay at the hospital for a while. Suddenly Jon's life is upside down! But with a handful of tricks from the doctors and nurses, and new friends, Jon discovers ways to cope with some of the tricky parts of having cancer. Accompanied by a resource guide for parents and caregivers, including hospital and support information, Jon's Tricky Journey opens a conversation between Inuit children facing a cancer diagnosis and their families to help make a difficult and confusing time more manageable"--|cProvided by publisher

Beautiful Life

How Nivi got her names

2016

by Laura Deal and Charlene Chua

Nivi has always known that her names are special, but she does not know where they came from. So, one sunny afternoon, Nivi decides to ask her mom how she got her names. The stories of the people Nivi is named after lead her to an understanding of traditional Inuit naming practices and knowledge of what those practices mean to Inuit. How Nivi Got Her Names is an easy-to-understand introduction to traditional Inuit naming, with a story that touches on Inuit custom adoption [an adoption in which a pregnant woman provides her child to someone who needs a child].

Beautiful Life

Many of the cover images on this site are from Google Books.

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