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Our intention is to acquire and make available ALL picture books featuring indigenous people and people of color published in the U.S. since 2002, including reprints. Inclusion of a title in the collection DOES NOT EQUAL recommendation. See our related readings page for suggested links for evaluating books.

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The banana-leaf ball

2017

by Katie Smith Milway and Shane Evans

"Separated from his family when they were forced to flee their home, a young East African boy named Deo lives alone in the Lukole refugee camp in Tanzania. With scarce resources at the camp, bullies have formed gangs to steal what they can, and a leader named Remy has begun targeting Deo. Then one day a coach gathers all the children to play soccer. Though Deo loves soccer and has even made his own ball out of banana leaves, he's unsure at first about joining in when he sees Remy on the field. But as Deo and the other boys get drawn into the game, everything begins to change. Their shared joy in playing provides the children-- including Remy--with a sense of belonging"-- Amazon.com

Beautiful Life

Maya

2016

by Mahak Jain and Elly MacKay

"The electricity in Maya's house has gone out again. Worse, she is afraid of the dark--and her fear has been even worse since her father died. Now it feels as if the darkness will never go away. Maya's mother distracts her with a legend about the banyan tree, which saved the world from the first monsoon by drinking up the floodwaters, and growing tall and strong. Later that night, unsettled by the noises around her, Maya revisits the story in her imagination. She ventures deep into the banyan tree, where she discovers not darkness but life: snakes slither, monkeys laugh, and elephants dance. Maya pushes her imagination even further to call up memories of her father, helping to soothe her fear and grief"--Front jacket flap

Beautiful Life

Hand over hand

2017

by Alma Fullerton and Renné Benoit

"Who says girls can't fish? When Nina asks her grandfather to take her fishing with him on his old banca boat, his answer is always the same: "A boat is not the place for a girl." But Nina is determined to go. She knows that if her lolo will show her how to jig the lines, to set the hook, and to pull in a fish, hand over hand, she can prove to everyone in their Filipino fishing village that she deserves her turn in the boat, girl or no!"--|cPublisher's website

Beautiful Life

Where will I live?

2017

by Rosemary A. McCarney

"This stunning photo-based picture book for younger readers takes a look at the thousands of children around the world who have been forced to flee war, terror, hunger, sickness, and natural disasters - young refugees on the move with very little left except questions. It's hard to imagine, but the images here will help unaffected children understand not only what this must feel like, but also how very lucky they are. The final message is that children, even with uncertain futures, are resilient and can face uncertainty with optimism. Gripping images are from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and include photographs of children in countries including Lebanon, Rwanda, Iraq, Niger, Hungary, Jordan, and Greece, among others"--|cProvided by publisher

Race/Culture Concepts

From far away

2017

by Robert N. Munsch, Saoussan Askar and Rebecca Green

"When Saoussan immigrated with her family from war-torn Lebanon, she was only seven years old. This picture book tells the story of how she had to adjust to her new home in Canada. She describes the frustration of not understanding the teacher when she started school, not knowing how to ask to go to the bathroom, and being terrified of a prop skeleton. This is the perfect book to help kids empathize with immigrant children whose experiences are very similar to Saoussan's"--|cProvided by publisher

Beautiful Life

Pablo finds a treasure

2016

by Andrée Poulin and Isabelle Malenfant

"Pablo and his sister spend every day at "Treasure Mountain," the local dump. There, they rummage through the mounds of garbage looking for items that their mother can sell in order to provide food for the family. Occasionally, they find a "real" treasure like some still-edible food, or a picture book, which Pablo delights in, even though he can't read. The work is exhausting, and sometimes not very lucrative, but the worst thing they have to contend with is Filthy-Face, a brutish bully who steals the finds of all the children. But one day, Pablo discovers a real treasure. Will he be able to keep it from falling into the hands of Filthy-Face? Simply written with highly expressive illustrations, this book brings home the reality of poverty around the world"--Publisher

Beautiful Life

Many of the cover images on this site are from Google Books.